Tuesday, 25 September 2012

Sea Otter Awareness

Apart from bunnies, there are few creatures cuter than sea otters. But they're not just cute and cuddly, they also play vital ecological roles. By eating the sea urchins that eat kelp, the sea otters help to preserve kelp beds. This means that the kelp beds absorb more carbon dioxide which reduces sea acidification. Healthy kelp beds also offer more habitat for fish, an awareness of which may help fishermen to value sea otters which otherwise they see as major competitors. This fact had lead to significant decreases in sea otter numbers.

Sea otters have increased in numbers in recent years but they still need to be actively conserved. Sea Otter Awareness Week (this week) aims to highlight the benefits that sea otters bring to coastal ecosystems and the problems that they face.

This week also sees the launch of the film Otter 501, which promises cuteness overload as well as an inspiring story of animal rescue. The film is just one part of an immersive multi media web experience, which you can read about here.

So look out for the film and take part in any activities, on-line or in your local area (particularly if you live on the Pacific coast of the USA or Canada).

As ever, text in red contains hyperlinks that take you to other web-pages where you can find out more.

11 comments:

EG CameraGirl said...

Good thing the numbers of sea otters are increasing. Our planet can use all the help it can get and otters do us a big service.

Ms Sparrow said...

I raised my family in Ottertail County by the Ottertail River. There is a giant statue of an Otter in the park there. The image of the otter has been quite prominent in our lives. Sadly, there are no river otters anywhere near Fergus Falls anymore. They are just a distant memory. I hope all the conservation efforts prevent more loss of these wonderful animals!

bunnits said...

Thanks for the heads-up. I will certainly be looking for this one.

Carol Steel 5050 said...

Thanks for this info about sea otters. I am/was woefully ignorant about their place in the cycles of the environment. Thanks for this nudge toward self education about them.

Draffin Bears said...

Hi Juliet,

Thanks for sharing this post on Sea Otters, was great.
Will look out for that movie.

Happy week
Hugs
Carolyn

Alison Wiley said...

Otters are wonderful creatures! I just discussed them an hour ago with two fellows who were camping on the South Umpqua river here in Oregon.
I wanted to let you and your readers know about a giveaway I'm doing of an excellent book. It's called "Wild: Lost and Found on the Pacific Crest Trail". Details on my site. This book just has me humming with energy. I think you'd love it, too.

Rabbits' Guy said...

Thanks for the news - no press up here at all, although I see several close by aquariums and labs are hosting events.

Interestingly, a book signing in Traverse City, Michigan - my old home town - but no sea otters for many miles!!!

eileeninmd said...

Thanks for the post, the sea otters are so cute. I am glad someone is looking after them. Have a great day!

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Seems like I should have heard of this week -- we are near the Oregon Coast and have seen sea otters there...I'll follow your links, thank you!

Sandy's witterings said...

I'm not sure how a sea otter would take to being cute and cuddly - the recently late Terry Nutkins lost two fingers to an otter when he was a boy.
Good to hear they're doing well though - I've only once seen an otter (not in the sea - crossing the road inland at night as it happened with some babys) and was delighted.

Crafty Green Poet said...

Sandy - fair point, but sea otters (the north american kind) just look the most cute and cuddly creatures apart from bunnies. I've seen otters in Scotland only twice, once near Oban and once in the water of leith in the centre of Edinburgh....