Wednesday, 24 October 2012

Hornbeam chandeliers

I've blogged about hornbeams before (if you want to read all the previous posts that have featured hornbeams, click here!). They're a British tree though native only to the south of England. They were planted along the Water of Leith when the area was an industrial power-house full of mills. Hornbeams have very hard and strong wood and were very useful in the construction of mill parts. Not only were they a very useful tree but they're also very beautiful. At this time of year their beautiful female catkins, that look like chandeliers, are changing colour along with their leaves.




I took these photos yesterday, you can see more photo from that walk here!

for Nature Notes

*
I'm delighted to have two poems published today at the eco-themed and wonderfully named Jellyfish Whispers.

As ever, red text contains hyper-links that take you to other web-pages where you can find out more.

11 comments:

Kerri said...

OH, there is just something about leaves..... they grab hold of my heart and won't let go. Your images are lovely!!

Dartford Warbler said...

Hornbeams are lovely trees. I do like the second image, with tree trunks and fallen leaves in the background.

Greenpatches said...

I did read right. They ARE chandeliers!

Rambling Woods said...

This are so interesting looking...perfect for Nature Notes. I love the poems Juliet..especially the autumn one as that is exactly how I feel but can't put it into words...lovely that you can..thank you for the support regarding my Mother's passing...Michelle

Carol Steel 5050 said...

Congratulations on poems published. And thanks for the wonderful Hornbeam photos. They remind me of the trees on my grandmother's propety when I was a child.

Ms Sparrow said...

The Catkin Chandeliers sound like they might be a singing group.

eileeninmd said...

It is a beautiful tree, lovely photos. Congrats on your poems, great news!

Rabbits' Guy said...

Fun photos! Enjoyed the poetry there too.

The Weaver of Grass said...

I love hornbeams Juliet - I always thought we were too far North for them but as you are considerably further to the North I am obviously wrong.

Crafty Green Poet said...

Weaver, Hornbeam is only native to the south east of England, not sure why it doesn't naturally grow further north. these trees are part of a group the oldest of which were planted for their timber when the area was full of mills

Jessica said...

Very pretty! Thanks for sharing. I am so unfamiliar with the plants of other countries.