Sunday, 2 November 2014

Fabulous fungi

As promised yesterday, here are some of the fabulous fungi we saw on Corstorphine Hill:


candlesnuff fungi (the white growth tucked away in the centre of the photo)

rosy bonnet

milky bell cap (sorry this photo is a bit blurry)

smooth earth ball

clouded funnel

sulphur tuft

If I've got any of those fungi wrong, please feel free to let me know in the comments. Below are two we're not at all sure of, this first one looks like a cauliflower fungus, but they're supposed to only grow on the roots of pine trees and this was growing on the branch of another type of tree (Crafty Green Boyfriend took this photo)

and not sure about this one, though I think it's a lilac bell cap

and finally this, showing an unknown species of lichen on the right hand trunk of the tree and the mycelium of probably a honey fungus all over the left trunk


13 comments:

eileeninmd said...

Cool looking fungi, I like the various shapes and colors.. Happy Sunday!

sage said...

Good work at identifying them! Have a wonderful Sunday.

speedyrabbit said...

interesting shapes

TexWisGirl said...

pretty neat!

Bill said...

Fabulous!

bunnits said...

just amazing

A Cuban In London said...

HWat I loved above all was the variety. Magnificent photos.

Greetings from London.

Carol Steel said...

Thanks for the fungi lessons. I always find these growths fascinating but never know what their names are.

Rabbits' Guy said...

Wow - good going! Tis the time for fungi!

Donna said...

Incredible images of some very unusual fungi.

Maureen @ Josephina Ballerina said...

Hey Juliet!
Isn't it interesting how many comments fungi generate? On my blog, too. Fun!
Smiling at you from Maryland, m & jb

Jennifer A. Jilks said...

I love spotting fungi in the forest. I feel so sad when I step on them, or have to cut the grass!

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Those are wonderful and I'm impressed with your knowledge.