Thursday, 22 August 2013

The Seventh Crane by Birgitte Rasine

The Seventh Crane is a beautiful fable about the relationships between humans and nature and growing up into your true self.

An unnamed young girl encounters a whooping crane on a beach on a family holiday. She never forgets the experience and she meets more cranes on the same beach as she grows up through her teenage days of writing her journal on the beach to her adulthood as a wildlife photographer. The story is told largely from the points of view of the cranes, and includes insights into their lives, nest making and courtship and family relationships.

It's a beautiful, touching story of how we can create close relationships with birds and how we can learn to use our wings and become the person we really are.

Thanks Story Cartel for my free download of The Seventh Crane by Birgitte Rasine.

7 comments:

Kat Mortensen said...

That sounds like a winner! I'll have to check out Story Cartel.

speedyrabbit said...

sounds lovely,xx Rachel

Tommaso Gervasutti said...

Cranes remind me of something of my childhood, a story or myth, told in Italian, about cranes ( we said "cicogne" which maybe is the same as "gru" ) as associated to gifts and the birth of children.
I also, sadly, remember that when I was a child, in the 60's, the cranes crossed Italy on their routes to the north but soon stopped doing so because of the hunters who kept shooting at them...

Ms Sparrow said...

What a lovely book. I don't think I have ever seen a crane.

Rabbits' Guy said...

That sounds nice ...

Birgitte Rasine said...

To Juliet, thank you so much for this lovely and unexpected review.

To Tommaso: your comment struck me as I used to live in Italy, one of my most beloved countries in Europe (I am from the Czech Republic originally). I wrote this story in part to remind us that these magnificent birds, like so many others, are and should be a part of our lives... and should not serve as mere sporthunting targets.

Blessings,
Birgitte

Crafty Green Poet said...

Bi Brigitte, thanks for visiting and commenting, it's a lovely book.