Sunday, 14 June 2009

The End of the Line

In my World Ocean's Day post earlier this week, I mentioned this film. The End of the Line is a documentary about the effect overfishing is having on the oceans. It charts the development of industrialised fishing fleets and how these are driving smaller fishing concerns out of business. It demonstrates how large fishing vessels very often destroy the marine environment where they are fishing, for example by dredging through coral reefs. It also shows how wasteful the fishing industry is, about 10% of the global catch is thrown back into the sea, unwanted and dead.

It is a very sobering film, but thankfully it is not all doom and gloom. The film also describes the campaign for marine conservation areas and shows how well these can work, though they cover less than 1% of our oceans so far. It also encourages the viewer to think about where the fish they eat actually come from. We are told about various restaurants and supermarket chains that have decided to source their fish more sustainably.

The End of the Line website is an excellent resource, giving information on campaigning and giving three easy steps to helping the situation:

1. only eat sustainable seafood (The Marine Stewardship Council advises where to buy sustainable seafood here)

2. Tell politicians to respect the science and to cut the fishing fleets to allow stocks to recover

3. Join the campaign for marine protected areas.

The End of the Line is showing at Edinburgh Filmhouse and at selected cinemas across the UK.

9 comments:

Bird said...

For years I've been wondering how the hell people could eat tuna when it was an endangered species. I'm so glad that through the publicity this film has garnered, perhaps some people will think again.

Crafty Green Poet said...

I hope so, Bird, it shocks me how little people have seemed to care about the sustainability of fish.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Interesting post Juliet - I really think that most people buy fish without giving sustainability a thought.
Word verification is boost - so lets hope your post opens a few eyes to the facts.

Deb G said...

This sounds like a very important film. I spent my childhood on fishing boats in Southeastern Alaska (and I think my family fished in a responsible way). I remember the most incredible abundance of sea life. It's so different now....

Mistlethrush said...

A sobering post - thanks

Michelle Johnson said...

Very informative post Crafty~ I don't think people take the time to see what bigger businesses are doing to the environment around us. Its sad really. I hope the film can grab people's attention. Good night~

Lynda Lehmann said...

Kudos to you for posting about such important issues. I've heard that within the next 20 or so years, there may be NO fish to eat, if we keep plundering the oceans in the way we have been doing. Absolutely NADA, none. :(

Rabbits' Guy said...

No-fishing, preserved Marine reserves .... the more the better.

Kay said...

A very important message. Thank you.